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Recorder consort (2 trebles, 2 tenors, 2 basses)
First performance: Ensemble directed by Evelyn Nallen,
Society of Recorder Players, Cambridge December 13 2008



Viola, electric guitar, cello, double bass
Duration c. 13'
First performance, Gavin Bryars Ensemble, York University February 11 2009



SATB, viola, electric guitar, cello, double bass
Duration c. 6'
First performance "The 24", directed by John Potter, Gavin Bryars Ensemble
York University, February 11 2009

Note : Text of Lauda 38 "Ben è crudele"

Text of Lauda 38 "Ben è crudele"

Ben è crudele e spietoso

ki non si move a gran dolore

de la pena del salvatore

che di noi fo si amoroso.

 

Amoroso veramente

fo di noi cum gram pietança,

poi ke d'alt'onnipotente

discese ad nostra semblança.

Or non fo grande disiança

per noi prender humanitate

et darsi in altrui podestade

quei k'e sovr'ogne poderoso?

 

Ben è crudele e spietoso

ki non si move a gran dolore

de la pena del Salvatore

che di noi fo si amoroso.

 

Doloroso flagellando

incoronâro di spina,

vis' e corpo sanguinando

di voi fêr gran disciplina;

cum gram tempesta, cum gram ruina

vi fecer la croce portare,

et menarv'ad iustitiare

ad guisa de ladron otioso.

 

Ben è crudele e spietoso

ki non si move a gran dolore

de la pena del Salvatore

che di noi fo si amoroso.

 

 

 

Cruel and pitiless is he

who is not moved to great sorrow

by the suffering of the Saviour

who loved us so greatly.

 

Truly, he loved us so much,

with such great pity,

that he came down from his high throne of power

to take on human form.

Now was that not a great desire,

that he took on humanity for our sake,

that he who had power over all

gave himself into the power of others?

 

Cruel and pitiless is he

who is not moved to great sorrow

by the suffering of the Saviour

who loved us so greatly.

 

They whipped the man of sorrows,

they crowned him with thorns;

his body gushing with blood

took hard punishment for your sake.

With great torment, with great damage

they made him carry his cross

and let him to led him to judgment

like a lazy beggar.

 

Cruel and pitiless is he

who is not moved to great sorrow

by the suffering of the Saviour

who loved us so greatly.



Peal of 13 bells - 3 pieces
Duration c. 50'
First performance Leeds Parish Church, April 25 2009

Note : Leeds Fuse

Leeds Fuse

Like most English people I grew up with the sound of church bells. The parish church in my home town of Goole would always ring from 10 to 10.30 on Sunday mornings to alert people to be in church by 10.30 (although I went to the Congregational Church, the alarm function still operated). The village where I now live in Leicestershire has an active bell-ringing team though at 8 bells they are much smaller in scale than those at Leeds Parish Church. The various systems of change ringing became attractive to several experimental musicians in the early 1970's - like Christopher Hobbs, Alex Hill, John White - providing, as they do a read source of systemic change and repetition, one of the ingredients of music of that time (Aran knitting patterns were another source...). John Cage, of course, wrote some pieces for bells though these are with carillon, a much simpler technique to execute (and Jon Hassell had some carillon pieces in the Punkt Festival in Norway last year.

But the physical reality of ringing with ropes is another thing and there is an immense repertoire of fine and mathematically complex sets of changes for this medium. It became clear that for me to write another in this tradition would be difficult to differentiate from others, except to specialists, and so I discussed other approaches with the Leeds team - with Steve Ollerton and Jeff Ladd. They pointed me to other approaches: some Italian church traditions, and the very interesting work done by sound artist Bill Fontana in 2005. This encouraged me to use techniques which change ringing seeks to avoid: sounding more than one bell at once, and writing harmonically. This is a real challenge to the ringers as synchronisation is difficult - but I relish the effect that comes from an honest attempt and only partial success! Spending a Sunday morning with the ringers was an inspiration and I dedicate the pieces to them.

 

 



Text: St Brendan
Choir (SATB), violin, organ
Duration c. 8'
First performance: Oakham School Choir, conductor Peter Davis, Martin Cropper, violin, Ivan Linford, organ.
Oakham School Chapel, May 24 2009

Note : Saint Brendan arrives at the Promised Land of the Saints

Saint Brendan arrives at the Promised Land of the Saints

Hear us God, our saviour, our hope throughout all the boundaries of the earth and in the distant sea.

Happy are they that live in your house. They shall praise you from generation to generation.

There before you lies the land which you have sought for a long time. You could not find it immediately because God wanted to show you his varied secrets in the great ocean.

Return, then, to the land of your birth, bringing with you some of the fruit of this land and as many of the precious stones as your boat can carry. The final day of your pilgrimage draws near so that you may sleep with your fathers.

After the passage of many times this land will become known to your successors, when persecution of the Christians shall have come. The river that you see divides the island. Just as this land appears to you ripe with fruit, so shall it remain always without and shadow of night. For its light is Christ.

Hear us God, our saviour, our hope throughout all the boundaries of the earth and in the distant sea.



Solo double bass and piano
Dedicated to my son Yuri
Duration c. 3'
Commissioned for publication by the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music (ABRSM)



Text: George Bruce
Tenor  and piano
Duration c. 12'
First performance: James Gilchrist, tenor, Julius Drake, piano,
Leeds Lieder+, The Venue, Leeds College of Music, October 3 2009

Note : Text of Songs from Northern Seas (text: George Bruce)

Text of Songs from Northern Seas (text: George Bruce)

1. The Fisherman

As he comes from one of those small houses

Set within the curve of the low cliff

For a moment he pauses

Foot on step at the low lintel

Before fronting wind and sun.

He carries out from within something of the dark

Concealed by heavy curtain,

Or held within the ship under hatches.

 

Yet with what assurance

The compact body moves,

Head pressed to wind,

His being at an angle

As to anticipate the lurch of earth.

 

Who is he to contain night

And still walk stubborn

Holding the ground with light feet

And with a careless gait?

Perhaps a cataract of light floods,

Perhaps the apostolic flame.

Whatever it might be

The road takes him from us.

Now the pier is his, now the tide.

  

2. A Departure

The short man waves his hand,

Half turns, and then makes off.

He is going to the country

Taking the road with the field of clover

On one side, the beach in the other,

The beach jarred by white stones,

The clover globed waiting for soft winds.

At the top of the rise within earshot

Of both sea and birds for a moment

He stops. (Stop now for ever there

To witness sea sound, bird note,

Sea town's cries.) But he

As if hurt and shamed,

Moves, head bent, clothes loose upon him.

We would offer blood, cash down,

For a last knowing gesture,

But the hill has him - or the sea.

 

3. The Helmsman

Write out the wind of his hometown

And reckon its dance, not as the impact

On a wall, but on its history.

 

This wind that killed in the desert

That slit the ice-cap,

That blasted first life from soil,

That chanted about the Inn at night,

Blew winter at the Babe;

 

Blows to a flare the light in any

Hero helmsman's brain till his head

Above its circles - hands on wheel -

Is circled by a cloudless constellation.

His eyes are stars, his arms embrace

An unhinged world. Astride the swelling wind

In the empty dawn, in the horizon light

He becomes stature.

 

4. The Seaman, an Epilogue

For Andrew Stewart

 

What vision his, Northward he stares

On polar suns that burst and flood

On black and blood-red water

Whose movement breaking the white light

Prismatically, spreads North and North

Salt gold and green to the cold berg's foot.

 

What vision his when South he looks

From sea to land, across those waterways -

Home, seen now in the perspective of space,

Men minute and shadow-like, active at their doors,

Pulling their doll-like crafts ashore.

He sees their purposes, yet hears nothing,

No pebbles' jar, no thump of boat, no shout

As rapid waters easily o'erwhelm

And run about the low decks and thrust

Aside the boats, returning them to the original sea.

 

Yet he trusting these shadows,

More real than rock, hearts perdurable

Without doubt or fear - homeward steers.



Texts: 2 Petrarch, Bronzino, Battiferri
Six voices a capella (STTTBarB)
Commissioned by Villa I Tatti: the Harvard University Centre for Italian Renaissance Studies, Florence

In memory of Professor Craig Smyth
Duration c. 14'
First Performance: Singer Pur; Villa I Tatti, Florence, October 16 2009

Note : Text of Four I Tatti Madrigals

Text of Four I Tatti Madrigals

I

Petrarca: Sonnet CCXIX

Cantai, or piango, e non men di dolcezza

del pianger prendo che del canto presi;

ch'a la cagion, non a l'effetto intesi

son i miei sensi vaghi pur d'altezza.

 

Indi a mansuetudine e durezza

et atti feri, et umili, e cortesi,

porto egualmente; né me gravan pesi,

né l'arme mie punta di sdegni spezza.

 

Tengan dunque vèr' me l'usato stile

Amor, madonna, il mondo, e mia fortuna;

ch'i' non penso esser mai se non felice.

 

Viva o mora, o languisca, un più gentile

stato del mio non è sotto la Luna;

sì dolce è del mio amaro la radice.

 

Rime Sparse 229 trans. Robert Durling

I sang, now I weep, and I take no less sweetness from weeping

than I took from singing, for my senses, still in love with

heights, are intent on the cause, not its outward effects.

 

Thence I bring away equally mildness and harshness, cruel

gestures and humble and courteous;  nor do any weights weigh

me down, nor does any point of disdain shatter my armour.

 

Let them keep toward me their accustomed style, Love, my

lady, the world, and my fortune; I think I shall never be

anything but happy.

 

Whether I live or die or languish, there is no nobler state than

mine under the moon, so sweet is the root of the bitter!

 

 

II

 

Petrarca: Sonnet CCXXX

I' piansi, or canto; ché 'l celeste lume

quel vivo sole alli occhi mei non cela,

nel qual onesto Amor chiaro revela

sua dolce forza, e suo santo costume:

 

onde e' suol trar di lagrime tal fiume,

per accorciar del mio viver la tela,

che non pur ponte o guado, o remi o vela,

ma scampar non potiemmi ale né piume.

 

Sì profondo era, e di sì larga vena

il pianger mio, e sì lunge la riva,

ch'i' v'aggiungeva col penser la pena.

 

Non lauro o palma, ma tranquilla oliva

pietà mi manda. e 'l tempo rasserena,

e 'l pianto asciuga, e vuol ancor ch'i' viva.


Rime Sparse 230 trans. Robert Durling

I wept, now I sing; for that living sun does not hide from my

eyes her heavenly light, in which virtuous Love clearly reveals

his sweet power and his holy ways;

 

thus he is wont to draw from me such a river of tears to shorten

the thread of my life, that wings and feathers could not rescue

me. Let alone bridge or ford or oars or sail.

 

So deep and from so full a source was my weeping and so distant

the shore, that I could hardly reach it even in thought.

 

Pity sends me not laurel or a palm but the tranquil olive, and

clears the weather, and dries my tears, and wishes me still to

live.

 


 

III

 

Bronzino: In morte del medisimo (Pontormo)

L'Aura vostr'alma, or che 'l fier Borea ammorza

Alle campagne I più vaghi colori,

E 'l corso impetra ai vivi argenti, e fiori

Vedova, e attrista ogni terrena scorza;

 

Col suo dolce spirar, di nuova forza

Par, ch' aer muova, e nuova terra irrori,

Nuovo Sol n'apra, e piante, acque, erbe, e fiori

Ne renda, e ta', ch' a rallegrar ne sforza.

 

On'io qual fronda al più nemico verno

Dentro agghiacciato, e fuori atro, e negletto,

Orbo del caro mio buon padre, e duce,

 

Vigor riprendo, e 'l giel distruggo interno,

Degli onor suoi mi vesto, e 'l suo diletto

Seren m'innalza, e scuopre la mia luce.

 

 

On the death of the same [Pontormo]

The aura ([l'aura] of your soul - now that the strong

North wind which fades the flowers

and freezes the river to icy silver, and leaves the earth

bare and saddened as a widow, has departed -

 

seems with its gentle breath, to move the air

with new strength, and bedew the earth, to open up the sky

so that plants, water, grass, and flowers

rejoice with renewed energy.

 

While I, like foliage in bitter winter,

frozen inside and out, bleak and neglected,

deprived of my dear father and leader,

 

I am revived and melt the ice within me,

I dress myself in his mantle and his love

and I rise serene, and reveal my own Light.

 

 

IV

 

Laura Battiferri: In morte del medesimo (risposta)

Bronzino in ciel l'alma beata luce

Quant' altro vago, e luminoso aspetto

Atto a produr fra noi più degno effetto

Come fu già del mondo onore, e luce;

 

Talchè l'erto sentier, ch' a Dio conduce

Fuor di questo mortal breve ricetto,

Mostra sì piano al vostr' alto intelletto,

Ch' uopo non ha di miglior guida, o duce.

 

Et io, che 'n alto mar senza governo

Quando è più nudo I ciel de' suoi splendori,

Erro sempre alternando or pioggia, or orza,

 

Già fatta preda al gran Nettuno, e scherno,

Scorgo non lunge I suoi lucenti albori

Sì che la stanca nave si rinforza.

 

 

Reply:

Bronzino, your beautiful soul shines in heaven;

what other lovely, luminous Power

could create among us greater works, honor and brilliance

than the world has ever known;

 

the steep path that leads to God

beyond this brief, mortal sojourn

is revealed so clearly to you

that you have no need for a better Guide or Leader,

 

While I, as if on the high seas with no captain,

the sky dark with heavy clouds,

I veer this way and that, seaward or windward,

 

though I was prey of great, mocking Neptune,

I see not far away the dawning light

and my weary boat takes heart.



Tenor, viola, cello, electric guitar, double bass
Duration c. 5'
First performance: John Potter and Gavin Bryars Ensemble
Union Chapel Islington, October 19 2009



Percussion quintet
Dedicated to Les Percussions Claviers de Lyon
First performance: Les Percussions Claviers de Lyon
Salle Varèse, National Conservatoire of Music, Lyon November 13 2009



Strings (solo violin, 4 violas, 4 celli, 2 basses)
Duration c. 27'
For the ballet by David Dawson
First performance: National Ballet Flanders, Antwerp, January 12 2010
Conductor, Benjamin Pope

Note : The Third Light(2010)

The Third Light(2010)

Production Photo: Royal Ballet of Flanders

Choreographer: David Dawson

 




Note : Piano Concerto (2010)

 

Piano Concerto (2010)

Ralph van Raat approached me about the possibility of my writing a concerto for him some time ago. I enjoyed talking with him and, above all, I liked very much his playing and his approach to music in general, and repertoire in particular. He is very much aware of the nature of my work and we did not feel it necessary to "consult" during the composition process but rather to speak in detail once the piece had been composed to discuss ideas and to make decisions. This continued right up to the performance.

Although the overall feeling of my piece does not convey any sense of urgency, and perhaps the overall tempo is slow, there is constant movement within the piece and Ralph was away of this tendency within my work when he approached me - and it is something that he relishes. Of course all pianists are capable of playing at fast tempi and with agility, but virtuosity also refers to musicality and I have always found it interesting to hear great players play (apparently) easy music (though this concerto is not "easy" in either sense).

The presence of a male chorus within the concerto represents a kind of homage to Busoni, a composer whom I have always admired and whose piano concerto has one in the last movement. As it happens I used a chorus of Russian bass voices in my recent double bass concerto so there is precedence within my own work too. Of course if there are voices then there are words and my choice of the poetry of the great Scottish poet Edwin Morgan alludes to my work with male choirs - I have set six of his "Sonnets from Scotland" already, three of them for the Estonian National Male Choir. The two sonnets The Solway Canal and A Place of Many Waters are heard in their entirety in the piece, and the first gives a subtitle to the concerto, just as Kukol'nik's "Farewell to St Petersburg" gives a subtitle to the double bass concerto.

http://www.classical-music.com/feature/meet-artists/ralph-van-raat

Note : Text of The Solway Canal

Text of The Solway Canal

Slowly through the Cheviot Hills at dawn
we sailed. The high steel bridge at Carter Bar
passed over us in fog with not a car
in its broad lanes. Our hydrofoil slid on,
vibrating quietly through wet rock walls
and scarves of dim half-sparkling April mist;
a wizard with a falcon on his wrist
was stencilled on our bow. Rough waterfalls
flashed on that northern island of the Scotts
as the sun steadily came up and cast
red light along the uplands and the waves,
and gulls with open beaks tore out our thoughts
through the thick glass to where the Eildons massed,
or down to the Canal's drowned borderers' graves.

Edwin Morgan (from Sonnets from Scotland)

 

Note : A Place of Many Waters

A Place of Many Waters

Infinitely variable water,
let seals bob in your silk or loll on Mull
where the lazy fringes rustle; let hull
and screw slew you round, blind heavy daughter
feeling for shores; keep kelpies in loch lairs,
eels gliding, malts mashing, salmon springing;
let the bullers roar to the terns winging
in from a North Sea's German Ocean airs
of pressing crashing Prussian evening blue;
give linns long fall; bubble divers bravely
down to mend the cable you love to rust;
and slant at night through lamplit cities, true
as change is true, on gap-site pools, gravely
splintering the puckering of the gust.

Edwin Morgan (from Sonnets from Scotland)



for String Orchestra (6.6.4.4.2 preferred; 4.4.4.4.2 minimum).

Arrangement of Third String Quartet for orchestra, for the ballet Reverence by David Dawson

First performance Netherlands National Ballet, Amsterdam, April 7 2010

Conductor Ermanno Florio



for solo piano

dedicated to Ralph van Raat

duration c. 10'

first performance: recording for Naxos, March 2010

Note : Ramble on Cortina

Ramble on Cortina

The term "Ramble" comes from Percy Grainger who I have always admired both as composer and pianist. He uses it for the kind of piece that other composers might have called a "Paraphrase" - his most notable exercise in this genre being the remarkable Ramble on Love, based on themes from Strauss's Der Rosenkavalier. 

This "Ramble" is based on themes from my vocal laude, which derive from13th century manuscripts found in Cortona, Italy. Parts of this piece come from a short set of three variations on one of my laude (Lauda 13 " Stomme Allegro) that I wrote for students at the 2003 Victoria Piano Summer School in Canada. I revised this material and added more parts to the work - alluding to other laude - shortly after I had written my Piano Concerto (The Solway Canal) for Ralph van Raat. It is, effectively, my first piece for solo piano. It is dedicated to Ralph van Raat.

 

 



Two madrigals for three female voices (Juice Vocal Ensemble) setting sonnets by Petrach

 

Note : Texts

Texts

1. "Io amai sempre" (Petrarch: Rime Sparse 85)

Io amai sempre, et amo forte ancora,

et son per amar più di giorno in giorno

quel dolce loco ove piangendo torno

spesse fiate quando Amor m'accora;

 

et son fermo d'amare il tempo et l'ora

ch'ogni vil cura mi levar dintorno,

et più colei lo cui bel viso adorno

di ben far co' suoi esempli m'innamora.

 

Ma chi pensò veder mai tutti insieme

per assalirmi il core, or quindi or quinci,

questi dolce nemici ch' i' tant' amo?

 

Amor, con quanto sforzo oggi mi vinci!

et se non ch' al desio cresce la speme,

i' cadrei morto ove più viver bramo.

 

Translation by Robert M. Durling

I have always loved and still I love and I shall day by day love even more that sweet place where weeping I return many times when Love saddens me;

And I am fixed in loving the time and the hour that removed every low care from around me, and above all her whose lovely face makes me in love with doing well, thanks to her example.

But whoever thought to see them all together, to assail my heart now from this side, now from that, these sweet enemies that I so much love?

Love, with what power today you vanquish me! And, except that hope increases with desire, I would fall dead, where I most desire to live.

 

2. "Solo et pensoso" (Petrarch: Rime Sparse 35)

Solo et pensoso i più deserti campi

vo mesurando a passi tardi et lenti,

et gli occhi porto per fuggire intenti

ove vestigio uman la rena stampi.

 

Altro schermo non trovo che mi scampi

dal manifesto accorger de le genti,

perché negli atti d'allegrezza spenti

di fuor si legge com' io dentro avampi.

 

Si ch' io mi credo omai che monti et piagge

et fiumi et selve sappian di che tempre

sia la mia vita, ch' è celata altrui;

 

ma pur sì aspre vie né sì selvagge

cercar non so ch' Amor non venga sempre

ragionando con meco, et io con lui.

 

Translation by Robert M. Durling

Alone and filled with care, I go measuring the most deserted fields with steps delaying and slow, and I keep my eyes alert so as to flee from where any human footprint marks the sand.

No other shield do I find to protect me from people's open knowing, for in my bearing, in which all happiness is extinguished, anyone can read from without how I am aflame within.

So that I believe by now that mountains and shores and rivers and woods know the temper of my life, which is hidden from other persons;

but still I cannot seek paths so harsh or so savage that Love does not always come along discoursing with me and I with him.

 

 



A short madrigal for seven voices - three sopranos; countertenor; tenor; baritone; bass

Note : Solitude Note

Solitude Note

In 2010 the Akademie Schloss Solitude, near Stuttgart in Germany, celebrated its twentieth anniversary with a series of events and projects.

For the anniversary evening - July 17 - at the Theaterhaus, Stuttgart the festival organizers planned four concerts in four different rooms; each with a different ensemble constellation featuring short compositions by as many former composition fellows as possible. Each composer was asked to follow the rule that each composition should begin and end with the Tristan Chord (B-F, D#-G# or Eb-Ab), thus separating the individual compositions for the listener during the concert.

 The Tristan Chord functions as the connection between the individual contributions.

At the invitation of his good friend Jean-Baptiste Joly (director of the Akademie since its inception) Gavin Bryars wrote an unaccompanied vocal piece, the "Solitude Madrigal", for Neue Vocalsolisten Suttgart

Text

"Nova angeletta" (Petrarch: Rime Sparse 106)

 

Nova angeletta sovra l'ale accorta

scese dal cielo in su la fresca riva

là 'nd' io passava sol per mio destino.

 

Poi che senza compagna et senza scrota

mi vide, un laccio che di seta ordiva

tese fra l'erba ond' è verde il camino.

 

Allor fui preso, et non mi spiacque poi,

si dolce lume uscia degli occhi suoi.

 

A new little angel on agile wings came down from heaven to the fresh shore where I was walking alone by my destiny.

Since she saw me without companion and without guide, a silken snare which she was making she stretched in the grass wherewith the way is green.

Then I was captured, and it did not displease me later, so sweet a light came from her eyes!

(Translation by Robert M Durling)

 

 

 

 

 



A group of (currently) 7 songs for tenor, soprano, electric guitar, viola, cello, double bass. Text Blake Morrison. First performance Kings Place, London Octopber 2010)

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Note : Gavin's note

Gavin's note

The Morrison Songbook sets texts by my long time collaborator Blake Morrison. Blake had written a number of poems intended to be set as madrigal texts for my First Book of Madrigals. Thirteen poems were used for that collection using those that were written from the male point of view. For a concert in London (November 2010) I re-wrote seven of these madrigals for tenor (John Potter) and members of my ensemble (James Woodrow, electric guitar; Morgan Goff, viola; Nick Cooper, cello; and myself on double bass). There will eventuallty be more - at least 14. For a performance of these 7 in Orleans, France, I ghave some of the solos to Anna Maria Friman and the set will ultimately have solos for bothg male and female voices.



Music for the ballet New Work by Edouard Lock, for La La La Human Steps.

For 4 players: saxophones (soprano, alto, tenor/baritone), viola, cello, piano

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Note : Dido and Orfeo

Dido and Orfeo

The music for Dido and Orfeo involves a reworking of music from Purcell's Dido and Aeneas and Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice, just as my previous collaboration with Edouard Lock, Amjad, took the Romantic ballet - Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake and Sleeping Beauty as its source.

The music is for a small ensemble, four players, playing saxophones (soprano, alto, tenor/baritone), viola, cello and piano. The original performance and subsequent touring performances, were directed by pianist Njo Kong Kie, who also directed Amjad. The other performers were viola (Jennifer Thiessen, who also performed with Amjad), cello (Jean-Christophe Lizotte) and saxophones (Ida Toninato - who plays soprano, alto and tenor saxophones. I subsequently replaced the tenor with baritone sax, as this is Ida's preferred instrument).

Sequence of work for edition

 (renumbered - original numbers in brackets))

(Purcell: Dido)

I Overture

II Banish Sorrow

III Ah, Belinda

IV Cupid only

V To the hills

VI The Triumphing dance

VII Prelude for the witches

VIII In our deep vaulted cell

IX Thanks to the lonesome vales

X Oft she visits - not used in dance

XI Haste haste

XII Dido's lament

XIII With drooping wings

XIV After the Witches' Prelude

 

(Gluck: Orfeo))

XV (XIV) Che Piangendo - not used in dance

XVI (XIVA) Pantomime

XVII (XIVB) Ah, si intorno

XVIII (XVIC) Chiamo il mio ben cosi - not used in dance

XIX (XV) Dance of the Furies

XX (XVI) Ah quale incognito

XXI (XVIA) Men Tiranne

XXII (XVII) Dance A

XXIII (XVIII) Dance B

XXIV (XIX) Air

XXV (XX) Dance of the Heros - not used in dance

XXVI (XXI) Vieni a regni

XXVII Che faro senza Euridice

XXVIII (XXII) Sposa

XXIX (XXIII) Si Aspetta

XXX (XXIV) Trio

 

Dance Sequence (with current score numberings)

 

(Purcell: Dido)

I Overture

II Banish Sorrow

III Ah, Belinda

V To the hills

VII Prelude for the witches

VIII In our deep vaulted cell

XI Haste haste

VI The Triumphing dance

IX Thanks to the lonesome vales

IV Cupid only

XVIII Dance B (from Orfeo, not Dido))

XIII With drooping wings

XII Dido's lament

 

After the Witches' Prelude (film)

 

(Gluck: Orfeo)

XIX Air

XIVA Pantomime

XIVB Ah, si intorno

XV Dance of the Furies

XVI Ah quale incognito

XVII Dance A

XXI Vieni a regni

XXII Sposa

XVIA Men Tiranne

XXIV Trio

 

 

 



A set of pieces for 4 players: saxophone (various), viola, cello, piano based on music by Purcell and Gluck. 

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Note : Dido and Orfeo

Dido and Orfeo

The music for Dido and Orfeo involves a reworking of music from Purcell's Dido and Aeneas and Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice, just as my previous collaboration with Edouard Lock, Amjad, took the Romantic ballet - Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake and Sleeping Beauty as its source.

The music is for a small ensemble, four players, playing saxophones (soprano, alto, tenor/baritone), viola, cello and piano. The original performance and subsequent touring performances, were directed by pianist Njo Kong Kie, who also directed Amjad. The other performers were viola (Jennifer Thiessen, who also performed with Amjad), cello (Jean-Christophe Lizotte) and saxophones (Ida Toninato - who plays soprano, alto and tenor saxophones. I subsequently replaced the tenor with baritone sax, as this is Ida's preferred instrument).

This is the third of my collaborations with Edouard, all of which have involved references to earlier music, and we plan more for the future.

Sequence of works

(Purcell: Dido)

I Overture

II Banish Sorrow

III Ah, Belinda

IV Cupid only

V To the hills

VI The Triumphing dance

VII Prelude for the witches

VIII In our deep vaulted cell

IX Thanks to the lonesome vales

X Oft she visits - not used in dance

XI Haste haste

XII Dido's lament

XIII With drooping wings

XIV After the Witches' Prelude

(Gluck: Orfeo))

XV (XIV) Che Piangendo - not used in dance

XVI (XIVA) Pantomime

XVII (XIVB) Ah, si intorno

XVIII (XVIC) Chiamo il mio ben cosi - not used in dance

XIX (XV) Dance of the Furies

XX (XVI) Ah quale incognito

XXI (XVIA) Men Tiranne

XXII (XVII) Dance A

XXIII (XVIII) Dance B

XXIV (XIX) Air

XXV (XX) Dance of the Heros - not used in dance

XXVI (XXI) Vieni a regni

XXVII Che faro senza Euridice (not used in dance)

XXVIII (XXII) Sposa

XXIX (XXIII) Si Aspetta

XXX (XXIV) Trio

 

Dance Sequence

In the dance performance the sequence was sllghtly different, and some numbers were not used

(Purcell: Dido)

I Overture

II Banish Sorrow

III Ah, Belinda

V To the hills

VII Prelude for the witches

VIII In our deep vaulted cell

XI Haste haste

VI The Triumphing dance

IX Thanks to the lonesome vales

IV Cupid only

XVIII Dance B (from Orfeo, not Dido))

XIII With drooping wings

XII Dido's lament

 

After the Witches' Prelude (film)

 

(Gluck: Orfeo)

XIX Air

XIVA Pantomime

XIVB Ah, si intorno

XV Dance of the Furies

XVI Ah quale incognito

XVII Dance A

XXI Vieni a regni

XXII Sposa

XVIA Men Tiranne

XXIV Trio

 

 

 

 



For electric guitar, viola, cello and double bass

Note : Gavin's note

Gavin's note

It Never Rains is a short piece written in the summer of 2010 that was commissioned by Jim Fox for the Californian label Cold Blue Music and is dedicated to them. The title comes from two sources: the Beach Boys song "It never rains in Southern California" and the English expression "It never rains but it pours" that is used whenever pressing matters arrive from all sides at the same time. It was written specifically for Jim to record, though the first live performance was by players in my own ensemble at a concert in Orléans, France in January 2011.